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WW1 & WW2 British / Australian Pattern 1845 Naval Cutlass & Scabbard

WW1 & WW2 British / Australian Pattern 1845 Naval Cutlass & Scabbard

$1,850.00
Product code: 1

Availability: In stock

Quick Overview:

A museum quality British / Australian Pattern 1845 Cutlass manufactured at the Royal Small Arms Factory (RSAF) Enfield between 1845 & 1848 and used by the Royal Navy and the Australian State Colonial and post federation Royal Australian Navy until the end of the First World War
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Details

A museum quality British / Australian Pattern 1845 Cutlass manufactured at the Royal Small Arms Factory (RSAF) Enfield between 1845 & 1848 and used by the Royal Navy and the Australian State Colonial and post federation Royal Australian Navy until the end of the First World War.

This superb weapon was officially designated the ‘Sword, Naval, Cutlass, Pattern 1845’ and was in use with the Royal Navy until the beginning of the Twentieth Centuary and with the Royal Australian Navy until the end of WW1. The cutlass was fitted with a high quality straight steel blade with a large cast steel guard and a riveted ribbed steel grip. The Pattern 1845 Cutlass was the first of a succession of robust issue cutlasses which included the Patterns 1871, 1889 and 1900.

As John Wilkinson describes in his book ‘British Cut & Thrust Weapons’; “In 1840 it was finally decided to fit the new bowl guard to existing cutlass blades and a number of these were modified and stored in the Tower of London….. On the night of 30 October 1841 a fire started in the armourers workshops of the Bowyer Tower and quickly spread to the ground store house…. which was reduced to a pile of ashes as was the supply of modified cutlasses. Although new stocks were ordered immediately there was for a period a dearth of weapons and the navy was forced to make do with the cavalry sword of the pattern just then being issued with the blades shortened to 27 in. This blade length seemed to suit the style of fighting that the cutlass was intended for and in 1858 all naval cutlasses were standardized at this length, with a slightly curved blade that had its origin in the modified cavalry sword. They also retained the double spear point with the false edge on the back. The grip remained in cast iron but was now two cast sides circumferentially molded to give finger holds that were riveted to the extension of the blade through the guard. The weapon was carried in a brown leather scabbard that was fitted with top and bottom mounts in steel (or brass) and with a stud on the top mount for frog suspension.

Harvey J.S. Withers in his excellent reference ‘World Swords 1400 – 1945’ describes how the Pattern 1845 was selected by the Board of Admiralty in 1842 following an assessment of four prototypes. He states that the new cutlass was ‘based on the 1821 Pattern Heavy Cavalry Troopers Sword’ and that it ‘took another three years before sufficient quantities were manufactured’. The Australian War Memorial (AWM) holds a similar Pattern 1845 in its collection as: http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RELAWM19095/ . Attached to this listing are two photographs of Royal Navy sailors engaged in cutlass drill with very similar pattern weapons, the first aboard HMS Resolution and the second aboard HMS Niobe in Cape Town South Africa in 1900.

This museum quality Pattern 1845 Cutlass has a 684mm long slightly curved blade still fitted with original scabbard.  The obverse ricasso is marked with War Department (WD) Broad Arrow ownership marks, an Enfield inspectors mark of a crown over E over 39 and an ‘X’ blade bending mark. The reverse ricasso is stamped with two Birmingham (BR) re-inspection marks from /87 (1887) and /93 (1893). The bowl hilt, like a number of other examples, is fitted with a characteristic RN/RAN brass diamond shaped plate engraved with the number 41 (probably a ships rack number). The underside of the guard is also marked with a clear N naval ownership mark. The riveted ribbed steel grips are finished in their original black painted lacquered finish(see picture). The Pattern 1845 scabbard is original and is in very good original condition.

This is a superb and highly sought after mid nineteenth century cutlass in excellent condition: ribbed steel hilt, steel polished bowl guard. Single edged unfullered cutlass steel blade with flattened ridge.

From Australia, a museum quality example of a highly sought after  naval cutlass.  The only example I have seen listed and unlike almost all others I have ever come across is still fitted with its original scabbard. You will not find a better original example anywhere - guaranteed.

Additional Information

Weight (kg) 3.0000
Country of Origin Australian, British
Sword Type Infantry, Naval
Maker RSAF Enfield
Year of Manufacture (circa) 1845
Overall Length (mm) 810.0
Blade Length (mm) 684.0
Blade Width (at guard) (mm) 37.0
Scabbard Pattern 1845, Brass and leather
Overall Length of Scabbard (mm) 720.0