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WW1 British - Scottish Regiments, Officers Broad Sword, Pattern 1865 – Near Mint

WW1 British - Scottish Regiments, Officers Broad Sword, Pattern 1865 – Near Mint

$2,750.00
Product code: 2

Availability: In stock

Quick Overview:

This is an excellent, near mint example of a Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865. Patinated plated steel basket hilt with white buckskin lining covered on the outside with scarlet cloth. Grips: Sharkskin covered wood bound with wire. Guard: patinated plated sheet steel basket decorated with ‘honeysuckle’ pattern scrollwork. The etched post 1881 blade variant is single fullered with two short fullers in the ricasso. The blade is fitted with a well used and heavily worn leather ‘field service’ leather scabbard fitted with a distinctive plated steel chape and ball finial which is also patinated.

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Details

AN ORIGINAL FIRST WORLD WAR BRITISH PATTERN 1865 SCOTTISH REGIMENTS OFFICERS BROADSWORD MANUFACTURED BY J.R. GAUNT & SON LIMITED LATE EDWARD THURKLE LONDON & BIRMINGHAMAND MARKED WITH THE ROYAL CYPHER OF KING GEORGE V (1910 – 1936). This Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865 is clearly described in Brian Robson’s excellent and authoritative reference ‘Swords of the British Army’ (P128-135).  It is identical to the sword described as a ‘Pattern 1831’ Highland officers’ broadsword on Page 40 of John Wilkinson-Latham’s ‘British Cut and Thrust Weapons’ and of type designated as the ‘Scottish Basket Hilted Broadsword’ by Harvey J.S Withers in his reference ‘World Swords 1400-1945’.

Scottish basket-hilted broadswords have been carried in the Scottish Highlands from at least the mid 1500’s.  Officers and men of Scottish mounted and foot regiments are known to have carried this type of sword from the early 1600’s.  However, prior to publication in 1826 of revised official ‘ 1822 Dress Regulations’ its carriage was unauthorised.  When the original Dress Regulations had been published four years earlier, the Pattern 1822 infantry officers sword was prescribed for all infantry regiments, and no mention was made of Scottish broadsword. As Brian Robson in the excellent reference ‘Swords of the British Army’ describes, in November 1822 General Sir John Hope, Colonel of the 92nd Highlanders received a letter informing him that the Commander-in-Chief had agreed to Highland Regiments continuing to carry ‘the Broad Sword as hitherto in use by Corps of that description’.

The pattern of steel basket-hilted broadsword which this sword represents and which is still in use today has remained practically unchanged since its form was regulated by a pattern sealed in 1865 and which gives the sword its designation; Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865. The only major change to the pattern was the revised blade regulation introduced in 1881 which changed blade form from a double fullered to a single fullered type.

With the exception of the blade, the basic characteristics of this sword are the same as the original Pattern 1865. The steel ‘honeysuckle’ basket hilt is lined with white buckskin covered on the outside with scarlet cloth. The grip is sharkskin covered wood bound with brass wire. The post 1881 blade variant is single fullered with two short fullers in the ricasso. This particular example is fitted with the characteristic leather ‘field service’ leather scabbard equipped with its distinctive plated steel chape and ball finial.

With regard to Australian service, at least 4 current Australian battalions have Scottish affiliations including the 5th/6th Battlion, Royal Victoria Regiment (Victorian Scottish Regiment), 10th/27th Battalion, Royal South Australia Regiment (Boothby and South Australian Scottish Regiment), 16th Battalion, Royal Western Australia Regiment (Cameron Highlanders) and the 41st Battalion, New South Wales Regiment (Byron Scottish Regiment). An example of one of these swords carried by an officer of the Queensland Scottish Regiment in the Nineteenth Century is held in the collection of the Australian War Memorial as exhibit REL29316.001 and can be viewed online at: http://cas.awm.gov.au/item/REL29316.001 .

This is an excellent, near mint example of a Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865. Patinated plated steel basket hilt with white buckskin lining covered on the outside with scarlet cloth. Grips: Sharkskin covered wood bound with wire. Guard: patinated plated sheet steel basket decorated with ‘honeysuckle’ pattern scrollwork. The etched post 1881 blade variant is single fullered with two short fullers in the ricasso. The blade is fitted with a well used and heavily worn leather ‘field service’ leather scabbard fitted with a distinctive plated steel chape and ball finial which is also patinated.

The obverse blade ricasso is stamped with the manufacturers trademark J.R. GAUNT & SON LIMITED LATE EDWARD THURKLE LONDON & BIRMINGHAM indicating that this sword was supplied by the well regarded Birmingham sword smiths who had started business in 1884. and had taken over the London based Edward Thurkle in 1897 when he was declared bankrupt. The other ricasso is marked with the ‘Damascene’ star and Prooved cartouche. The Company started using the style of naming displayed on this sword when they took over the London based firm of Edward Thurkle in 1897, following Thurkle’s bankruptcy. The blade etching is clear with the usual Scottish broadsword thistle pattern scrollwork and the Royal Cypher of HM King George V (GRV - Georgius Rex V - 1911-1936). 

The heavy duty ‘claymore’ style broadsword blade is of superior quality and is in ‘near mint’ condition.  The blade is etched with the usual crown and thistle motifs common to Highland Infantry Regiments.  The sword is also engraved on both hilt and scabbard with a matching military stock number 705-951-960indicating that this sword was at some point Regimental property  The guard and grip are very good with minor patination on the inside and outer rim of the basket guard consistent with age and use.  The hilt and pommel are tight, matched and secure. The Pattern 1865 ‘broadsword’ scabbard is in similarly excellent condition.  In summary, both sword and scabbard are in superb near mint condition.    

Type: Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865
Maker: J.R. GAUNT & SON LIMITED LATE EDWARD THURKLE LONDON & BIRMINGHAM
Overall Length: 1015.0 mm
Blade Length:  827.0 mm
Blade Width (at guard):  28.0 mm
Scabbard Length: 855.0 mm

This scarce First World War Scottish Regiments, Officer’s Broadsword, Pattern 1865 is in superb, near mint condition.  Its a first class example of a type still in service with both the British and Australian Army today. Original Pattern 1965 swords are becoming increasingly difficult to find especially in this sort of condition.  The best original WW1 basket hilted Pattern 1865 I have ever seen listed, and certainly the best I have sold, this example is a fair dinkum ripper.  You will not find a better example.

Additional Information

Weight (kg) 2.5000
Country of Origin Australian, British
Sword Type Infantry, Officer
Maker J.R. GAUNT & SON LIMITED LATE EDWARD THURKLE LONDON & BIRMINGHAM
Year of Manufacture (circa) 1915
Overall Length (mm) 982.0
Blade Length (mm) 825.0
Blade Width (at guard) (mm) 29.0
Scabbard Pattern 1965 ‘broadsword’
Overall Length of Scabbard (mm) 865.0