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WW1 British Pattern 1907 Sword Bayonet - Hooked Quillon – Unit Marked

WW1 British Pattern 1907 Sword Bayonet - Hooked Quillon – Unit Marked

$2,275.00
Product code: 43

Availability: SOLD

Quick Overview:

A FIRST WORLD WAR BRITISH SHORT MAGAZINE LEE ENFIELD (PATTERN 1907) BAYONET WITH A HOOKED QUILLON AND EARLY NUMBER 1 MARK I SCABBARD MANUFACTURED AT THE ROYAL SMALL ARMS FACTORY ENFIELD (EFD) IN SEPTEMBER 1909 AND FITTED WITH A PATTERN 1914 BROWN LEATHER BAYONET FROG. UNIT MARKED TO THE 1ST BATTALION, SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT. This bayonet is in very good condition and was manufactured in September 1909by the highly regarded Pattern 1907 maker; ROYAL SMALL ARMS FACTORY (RSAF) - ENFIELD and has the Regimental mark of the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, one of the most famous Regiments in the British Army, on the pommel (S STF R 56). It is one of those rare examples that was not adapted after 1915 and as a result it has not had a clearance hole drilled through the pommel or had its original ‘hooked’ quillon removed.

Details

Enfield P.1907 Manufactured in 1909 and issued to the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment  – Rare & early No.1 Mk.I Scabbard and Pattern 1914 Frog

A FIRST WORLD WAR BRITISH SHORT MAGAZINE LEE ENFIELD (PATTERN 1907) BAYONET WITH A HOOKED QUILLON AND EARLY NUMBER 1 MARK I SCABBARD MANUFACTURED AT THE ROYAL SMALL ARMS FACTORY ENFIELD (EFD) IN SEPTEMBER 1909 AND FITTED WITH A PATTERN 1914 BROWN LEATHER BAYONET FROG. UNIT MARKED TO THE 1ST BATTALION, SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT.  This bayonet is in very good condition and was manufactured in September 1909by the highly regarded Pattern 1907 maker; ROYAL SMALL ARMS FACTORY (RSAF) - ENFIELD and has the Regimental mark of the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, one of the most famous Regiments in the British Army, on the pommel (S STF R 56).  It is one of those rare examples that was not adapted after 1915 and as a result it has not had a clearance hole drilled through the pommel or had its original ‘hooked’ quillon removed.

The original markings are clearly visible, with the 1907 type mark, EFD (Enfield) makers stamp and September 1909 (0 ’09) date stamped on the obverse ricassso as well as the crown and cypher of HM King Edward VII (ER - Edwardius Rex - 1901-1910).  On the reverse ricasso it also bears a 'broad arrow' Government acceptance mark and the 'X' blade ‘bending’ proof mark. It also has a couple of unique ROYAL SMALL ARMS FACTORY (RSAF) - ENFIELD inspector’s marks of a crown over 44 over E (see picture). A superb picture of British Lewis Machine Gunners with their weapon mounted on a stripped down Ford Model T at the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem in 1917 is attached for interest.

These early Pattern 1907's, were equipped with a hooked quillon which was designed to deflect an opponent’s bayonet but was found to catch on obstacles, particularly barbed wire.  As a consequence the Master General of the Ordinance ordered that this feature be removed from British and Colonial bayonets in 1915.  Hooked quillons were therefore removed from existing versions and all bayonets manufactured after 1915 were produced with truncated quillons. This is an example of one of those 'Hooked Quillon' Pattern 1907 bayonets that was adapted.  Interestingly, almost all photographs of ANZAC’s in Gallipoli show them equipped with P 1907 still sporting their hooked quillons.  By mid 1916 nearly all of those bayonets that had been carried at Gallipoli and still in use with ANZAC troops would have had their hooked quillons removed.  For reference a picture is attached to this listing of an Australian Digger manning a fire step in Gallipoli with a British made Pattern 1907 (identifiable by the ricasso cipher) with a hooked quillon, no clearance hole and unit marks on the pommel.

The fact that this bayonet does not have a clearance hole in the pommel is unusual as in mid 1916 instructions were issued to all British manufacturers to add this alteration to future production.  Armourers were also instructed to carry out this modification when bayonets were returned to store or submitted for repair.  For some now unknown reason this example was never altered.

The hilt with its hooked quillon and 17 inch blade (which is still retains much of its original bluing - see picture) is very good with the Regimental mark of the of the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, stamped into the pommel (S STF R 56).  The rare early Number 1 Type I, Scabbard Enfield(EFD) manufacturedvariant, with its internal chape, is undamaged, tight and in similarly good condition - see picture.  The brown leather Webbing Equipment (W.E.) Pattern ’14 frog is very good and is unmarked. Introduced with the W.E. Patt. '14 in August 1914, this Frog was designed to carry the Pattern 1888 or Pattern 1907 Bayonet scabbard. The 1-inch wide tab at the rear was used to attach the Helve carrier. As with all leather parts of the Pattern 1914 Infantry Equipment, the colour was changed from Service Dress to the darker London Brown by List of Changes entry L. of C. 17219, acceptance dates 31 December 1914 and 30 March 1915. The same L. of C. also modified the Frog by adding two additional rivets at each bottom corner. This frog is in good original condition with a torn fixing strap and is unmarked.

Apart from the hooked quillon, what makes this bayonet particularly special is the link to the 1st Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment one of the finest Regiments of the British Army with a fighting reputation second to none.  At the outbreak of WW1, the 1st Battalion was serving at Pietermaritzburg, in South Africa.  They returned to Britain and joined the 22nd Brigade of the 7th Division of the British Army.  They sailed to France on the 7th October 1914 to reinforce the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) fighting at Ypres. The Battalion served on the Western Front for the duration of the war and fought in many of the seminal battles of the war including Second Ypres in 1915, the Somme in 1916, Loos (including Hill 70) and Arras in 1917.  In November of that year they moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance against the Austria-Hungary forces and engaged in various actions including the crossing the Piave and the Battle of Vittoria Veneto.

With regard to Australian use, Ian D Skennerton in his outstanding reference work ‘Australian Service Bayonets’ writes: ‘The Pattern 1907 sword bayonet was actually not introduced until a year after the Mk III S.M.L.E., in 1908 and some were purchased by Australia shortly afterwards.  Many Australian troops were equipped with British manufactured bayonets and while most were subsequently stamped with Australian ownership marks not all were. An identical example, also manufactured by Wilkinson is held in the collection of the Australian War Memorial (AWM) as exhibit RELAWM28888 and can be viewed online at: http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RELAWM28888/ . More interesting, is the example believed to have been carried by 2355 Private John Francis Quinn of the 22nd Battalion at Pozieres on the Western Front which can be viewed at: http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/RELAWM00564/ .

This is a very good First World War bayonet from a highly regarded manufacturer in the very best condition: steel and wood hilt with a round steel press button and internal spring, two piece wood grips without the usual regular oil hole in the pommel, secured by two steel screw bolts, steel crossguard with muzzle ring and hooked quillon.  Single edged steel blade with round fullers, dated 9 ‘09.

Maker: Enfield
Overall Length: 555.0 mm
Blade Length:  435.0 mm
Blade Width (at guard):  23.0 mm
Scabbard: Early Pattern No.1 Mk I, steel and leather with a small teardrop fixing stud and internal chape
Overall length of scabbard:  468.0 mm
Frog: Pattern 1914 brown leather and brass

A rare 'hooked quillon' Pattern 1907 Bayonet, manufactured by ENFIELD in 1909, and fitted with an early Number 1 Type I Pattern 1907 Scabbard still fitted with its Pattern 1914 Bayonet Frog. Unit marked on the pommel this bayonet is in good condition, displaying evidence of use with British and Commonwealth Forces before and during WWI.  You are unlikely to find a better example of one of these rare and highly sought after bayonets. If you are after the definitive First War Pattern 1907, this is it.

Additional Information

Weight (kg) 2.0000
Country of Origin British
Pattern Pattern 1907
Bayonet Type Sword
Maker Enfield
Year of Manufacture (circa) 1909
Overall Length (mm) 555
Blade Length (mm) 435
Blade Width (at guard) (mm) 23
Scabbard Early Pattern No.1 Mk I
Overall Length of Scabbard (mm) 468
Frog Pattern 1914