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British/Australian Colonial Volunteer Pattern 1860 Sword Bayonet

British/Australian Colonial Volunteer Pattern 1860 Sword Bayonet

$625.00
Product code: 16

Availability: SOLD

Quick Overview:

British/Australian Pattern 1860 Yataghan Sword Bayonet (similar to the pattern 1856/58) designed for use with the Pattern 1860 Enfield and Pattern 1861 Snider Enfield series of short rifles (Sergeants Models).  This example, like many Pattern 1856/58/60 bayonets, was produced under licence in Germany and is the pattern issued to pre-federation colonial volunteer militia.

Details

British/Australian Pattern 1860 Yataghan Sword Bayonet (similar to the pattern 1856/58) designed for use with the Pattern 1860 Enfield and Pattern 1861 Snider Enfield series of short rifles (Sergeants Models).  This example, like many Pattern 1856/58/60 bayonets, was produced under licence in Germany and is the pattern issued to pre-federation colonial volunteer militia.

Ian D. Skennerton in his reference ‘Australian Service Bayonets’ states that the “New South Wales purchased a quantity of Imperial Government stores in the 1870’s which included a quantity of Snider-Enfield Artillery Carbines with sword bayonets, Snider-Enfield Long Rifles and bayonets, and Snider-Enfield Sergeants Short Rifles with sword bayonets”. This bayonet is in all likelihood one of those purchased to equip Colonial Volunteer Militia in the later half of the nineteenth century.

This bayonet has a 28 inch (578mm) long recurving blade, often called "Yataghan" due to similarities in shape to some Turkish blades.  The blade, which on this example is heavily patinated, is fullered on both sides, whilst the grips are black chequered leather, worn at the corners, secured to the tang by four rivets.  As the Pattern 1860 Enfield Short Rifle has a sword bar on the barrel, the muzzle ring on the bayonet is level with the top of the tang, and a shallow concave groove is evident along the top of the hilt to allow for the barrel of the carbine.  There is a disc finial on the top of the muzzle ring and another at the lower end of the quillon.  The locking bolt is on the left side of the beak-shaped pommel, with the return spring inletted into the right side and secured by a screw.  The bayonet has an aged patina consistent with age and use.

With regard to Australian service, the Pattern 1860 was widely employed in New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia. While the rifles were sometimes colonially marked the bayonets are rarely stamped. The weapons remained in service up to and beyond Federation in 1901. Ian D. Skennerton & Robert Richardson in their seminal reference ‘British & Commonwealth Bayonets’ state that RSAF Enfield reported in 1885/6 that “1000 selected Patt. 1860 sword bayonets for Snider rifles” were re-converted from Martini Henry ‘bushed’ condition for use in the state of Victoria. Also in 1886, RSAF Birmingham supplied 1000 sword bayonets to New South Wales. A photograph of the Australian Contingent, some of whom are reported to have been issued with similar weapons, at Handoub Suakin 1884 in the Sudan is attached to this listing for reference.

With regard to British Army use, these bayonets were employed by all arms and services within the regular British Army and Colonial forces but unlike this example they are marked with War Department ownership marks. Unmarked examples, usually procured under commercial contract, were most often employed by volunteer and militia units. The bayonet was used by the British Army in all of it's major campaigns of the period until finally being declared obsolete in the early 1900’s although, as already mentioned, many continued in use with Colonial and Imperial troops until much later.

These Pattern 1860 bayonets are now scarce, especially in this condition.  Manufacture of these sword bayonets was not restricted to the United Kingdom and German companies in the famous arms manufacturing town of Solingen also produced them under contract.  This example which has no manufacturers mark stamped on the ricasso (see picture) was most probably manufactured in Germany under contract. 

This is a mid nineteenth century bayonet from a German maker in very good condition: steel and leather chequerboard hilt with a leaf spring steel press button release catch, secured by a single steel screw bolts, steel crossguard with muzzle ring and flat finial crossguard. Single edged fullered Yataghan steel blade with flattened ridge.

From Australia, A scarce and highly sought after pre-federation colonial militia Pattern 1860 Bayonet that is as original as you are ever likely to find. It has an excellent aged patina and is a very good example of its type.

Additional Information

Weight (kg) 2.2000
Country of Origin Australian, British
Pattern Pattern 1860
Bayonet Type Sword
Maker Solingen Contract
Year of Manufacture (circa) 1860
Overall Length (mm) 713
Blade Length (mm) 578
Blade Width (at guard) (mm) 31
Scabbard No
Overall Length of Scabbard (mm) No
Frog No